Day 51: Staying Safe

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COMPETITION!

Win tickets for you and a guest to the Race to the Pole Welcome Home Reception at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace on the 16th of February 2012! All you have to do is make a donation via the JustGiving.com page to enter our prize draw. There are two tickets (plus a guest each) up for grabs – the winners will be announced on January 20th 2012.


 

AMUNDSEN TEAM

Distance to the Pole (straight line): 215 nmi
Total distance travelled: 482.1 nmi

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO REPORT

In Association with the Royal British Legion

Henry Worsley delivers Day 51′s report for the Amundsen team. Henry obviously went to the Michael Fish School of Meteorology as his prediction of fine weather couldn’t have been more wrong. Instead, the guys experienced a “shocker”, with white out conditions and winds of up to 19mph. At least the temperature was relatively warm at just -20 degrees, a marked improvement on the -49 they experienced three days ago.

Henry reads from Amundsen’s diary, which always helps to put things in perspective. The guys end the day on 12.2 nautical miles, which means they’re still on target. Keep it up, chaps!

Can’t see the audio player? Download the audio as an MP3
(Click to open directly or right-click and choose “save target or “save link as”)

MAP & SITREP

Please keep pressing the ‘play’ button to advance to the next slide of the presentation.


SCOTT TEAM

Distance to the Pole (straight line): 305 nmi*
Total distance travelled: 468.5 nmi*
* No sitrep today – exact progress unknown

     

LISTEN TO THE AUDIO REPORT

Team Scott is unfortunately tentbound again on Day 51, but it is never without good reason. As Mark explains in his audio report, there’s just no messing around when you’re navigating crevasse fields and enormous chasms. The guys play it safe, which is absolutely the right thing to do. 

Listeners can hear for themselves the harsh wind outside the tent. The conditions causes some interference in the satellite link, we apologise for the poor quality of the audio in places. 

Mark adds on a second message explaining some of his remarks in his first message. We don’t feel that he really needed to explain himself, I think every reader understands what he meant the first time and after 51 days, we’ve all got to know Mark and the decent chap he is, and no-one would ever think he meant anything badly! Bless Mark for worrying, what a good bloke he is. Just you chaps concentrate on staying safe and getting to the Pole in one piece! (Or three, as it were).

Can’t see the audio player? Download the audio as an MP3
(Click to open directly or right-click and choose “save target or “save link as”)

MAP & SITREP

Unfortunately, the sitrep from Team Scott for Day 51 did not come through to us here in the UK. As such we cannot give you a sitrep today, however from the audio report, we understand that they haven’t moved that far from yesterday’s position. We hope to have a sitrep for you tomorrow. Many thanks for your understanding. 

Wally Herbert contemplating the Shackleton Icefalls and Buckley Island. Shackleton and Scott, and Henry Worsley in 2008, all followed a route virtually under the 'island'. The Wild Icefalls, which Team Scott has just ascended, are seen in the distance on the far side.

Wally Herbert contemplating the Shackleton Icefalls and Buckley Island. Shackleton and Scott, and Henry Worsley in 2008, all followed a route virtually under the 'island'. The Wild Icefalls, which Team Scott has just ascended, are seen in the distance on the far side.

Aerial view from above Plunket Point looking 90 nautical miles north down to the entrance of the Beardmore with Mt Hope on the left and Mt Kyffin on the right. Cloudmaker (with its small cloud) in the middle distance, extreme left, with Wedge Face opposite.

Aerial view from above Plunket Point looking 90 nautical miles north down to the entrance of the Beardmore with Mt Hope on the left and Mt Kyffin on the right. Cloudmaker (with its small cloud) in the middle distance, extreme left, with Wedge Face opposite.

Aerial view looking southeast across the Wild Icefalls in the upper Beardmore, with Buckley Island beyond, to the left, and Mt Darwin to the right. The Shackleton Icefalls and the Dominion Range are in the left background with the Polar Plateau to the right.  Team Scott sledged past the near side of the whitish heavily crevassed area in the centre of the photo on Day 49 and are now tent-bound just a mile or so beyond.

Aerial view looking southeast across the Wild Icefalls in the upper Beardmore, with Buckley Island beyond, to the left, and Mt Darwin to the right. The Shackleton Icefalls and the Dominion Range are in the left background with the Polar Plateau to the right. Team Scott sledged past the near side of the whitish heavily crevassed area in the centre of the photo on Day 49 and are now tent-bound just a mile or so beyond.

Wally Herbert's relief shaded map. It covers the area from the Axel Heiberg in the east, top left, to the Beardmore 125 nautical miles to the west on the right. Note that south is at the top.

Wally Herbert's relief shaded map. It covers the area from the Axel Heiberg in the east, top left, to the Beardmore 125 nautical miles to the west on the right. Note that south is at the top.


REFLECTIONS

Part 1: ‘Shanks’ Pony vs. Shaggy Dogs’

A series of reflections on Antarctic travels past and present, by Peter Otway. In the early 1960s, Peter surveyed much of the areas through which our teams are now passing. In this, Part 1, Peter compares the use of dogs with manhauling.

“As I have followed Teams Scott and Amundsen on their long slog across the featureless Ross Ice Shelf and now, heaving their way up two very different but equally treacherous glaciers leading to the South Pole, it has taken me back half a century to the days I was in a team exploring and mapping much of the same terrain as part of the New Zealand geological and survey mapping programme with Brit Wally Herbert as our experienced and inspirational leader. Perhaps more than most, I have felt their highs and lows as they battle every obstacle and hardship the Antarctic can throw in their path, and their dogged determination to achieve their goal whatever the odds.”

Click here to read Part 1 of Peter Otway’s Reflections in full


INTERACTIVE MAP

Keep track of both teams with our interactive Google Earth map. Zoom in to see each day’s progress, with the position marked by pictures of team leaders Henry Worsley and Mark Langridge. Click on the icon to see that day’s sitrep in full.


View SACR in a larger map


A Special Message to all Schools

The three schools that raise the most funds for the Scott-Amundsen Race and the Royal British Legion will be rewarded with a visit from the Scott team! Mark, Vic and Kev will give a full presentation during their visit, with slides, videos, images, in short, the full works.

Schools wishing to donate should do so via the JustGiving.com page. Enter the name of your school when donating, and email Andy the webmaster atinfo@scottamundsenrace.org to make sure we register your donation.

We’d also like to invite all the schools that are following the progress to contact the webmaster, so that you can be mentioned on a new “Scott-Amundsen Schools” page. Please include a very short text on your school and any SACR-related activities, especially fundraising efforts! We’ll list your school plus a link to your website.

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Comments

  1. David Lyon on December 24, 2011 at 7:27 am said:

    Congratulations on being the first up both glaciers. David

  2. Keith & Ena on December 23, 2011 at 11:35 pm said:

    Keep going . go for the pole we will fatten you up back home !! Pledged £200 plus gift aid tonight Love keith & Ena xx

  3. Peter Otway on December 23, 2011 at 10:41 pm said:

    I have been following your daily battle with the worst Madam Antarctica can throw at you and know you will beat her in the end. Meanwhile have the happiest, or at least the most memorable, ultra white Christmas possible under the circumstances. All the best – Peter

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